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Samsung Electronics : has announced the launch of the flagship 4” chic smartphone Wave 3, the social-powerhouse Wave M and the smart-start Wave Y. These all wave smartphones will be on display at Samsung’s Stand at IFA 2011 in Berlin.


All three devices, borne of Samsung’s heritage in innovation, are powered by Samsung’s own new Bada 2.0 platform which brings together a wide variety of new capabilities including multi-tasking, Wi-Fi Direct, voice recognition and Near Field Communication.
ChatON is Samsung’s proprietary mobile communication service that works across all major mobile devices. A global cross-platform communication service links all your friends and contacts instantly. Micro-communities can be set up through group chat, while a web client allows the sharing of content and conversations between mobile and PC.

Samsung Apps, an integrated application store for Samsung smartphones, is also available. With an improved UI and enhanced store features, Samsung Apps offers a wide variety of applications from globally well-known content to locally-customized applications.

“Smartphones are gaining popularity by the day. The new additions to the Wave portfolio are the first to benefit from the power of our bada 2.0 platform; the full extent of our commitment is clear to see in each device. We’ve produced easy-to-use smartphones that will inspire the market,”
- JK Shin, President and Mobile Communications business

Smarts meet style, the Wave 3


The Samsung Wave 3 is a beautiful and chic smartphone that crams a market-leading 4” Super AMOLED display. Building on the Wave series’ style heritage in full metal design, the Wave 3 is the perfect device for the style-conscious consumer. Excellently constructed of anodized aluminum, the slim yet solid unibody design supports your active, on-the-move lifestyle. With smarter multi-tasking, seamless push notification and Wi-Fi Direct, the Wave 3 has the capabilities to keep you connected and entertained at all times.


The first ChatON equipped smartphone, the Wave M


The Samsung Wave M allows users to keep up-to-date with their hectic social lives with ChatON and Social Hub. With a wide 3.65” HVGA screen made from tempered glass and a metallic body, the Wave M lets users stay socially connected from everywhere. ChatON, streamlined messaging feeds, enhanced on-the-go web browsing and Wi-Fi applications deliver a seamless mobile experience. Wi-Fi Direct and NFC (optional) add further functionality.


A smart-start, the Wave Y


The Samsung Wave Y is the perfect device to introduce new users to the world of smartphone experiences. With a stylish metallic hairline body and large 3.2” HVGA screen, new users can take their first steps to mobile social networking with Social Hub and ChatON. Simple personalisation is enabled via the Live Panel, Lock Screen and Folder management, while Music Hub, a portable music manager, gives users a jukebox in their pocket.
 
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NEW YORK -- Phone service often cuts out when it's needed the most – when disaster strikes.
That applies to cellphones too, even though they seem independent of power and phone lines.
Here are some tips for communicating with emergency services and loved ones as Irene sweeps up the East Coast:
_ Cellphones may work even if the power goes out, but you can't count on them. The phones themselves, of course, have batteries. And the cell towers that relay your calls and other messages are often equipped with backup batteries and some have generators. Verizon says all its sites have at least eight hours of backup power.
But tower batteries run down, and refueling generators with diesel can be difficult if roads are flooded. If hurricane recovery drags on for days, cell service may go out due to a lack of "tower power." This is what took out the cellphone network in southern Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, complicating rescue and recovery efforts.

After Katrina, federal regulators wanted to mandate that all cell sites have at least eight hours of backup power. But much of the wireless industry objected to the rule, claiming it was illegally drafted and would present a huge economic and bureaucratic burden that would divert resources from the most disaster-prone areas. The requirement was tossed out.


Power loss isn't the only threat to a wireless network. Calls are carried from the towers by landlines, which are also susceptible to damage, and they connect to communications networks that also need power to function.
Wireless carriers have a menagerie of backup equipment to deploy in areas where their infrastructure has been destroyed, or where emergency responders need extra capacity. Towable cell towers are called Cells on Wheels, or COWs, while Cells on Light Trucks are called COLTs. AT&T calls generators on trailers GOATs.
_ Even if cellphones work, wireless networks may be overloaded by people calling to check in on each other or surfing the Web. Tuesday's earthquake on the East Coast triggered such an overload, even though there was no physical damage to towers or lines.



Cellphone companies recommend text messaging rather than calling in any disaster, because text messages use much less network capacity. They also don't use much battery power. Using Facebook and Twitter can be tempting, but try to keep usage brief and use the apps rather than web browsers if possible, to minimize network use and battery drain.
If you have a battery-powered radio, use it to get your news updates rather than taxing the wireless network and your phone battery.
_ Keep your phones plugged in so that they're fully charged if the power goes out. There are various products available that can recharge a cellphone from a larger rechargeable battery, AA batteries, or through a car adapter.
_ Corded landline phones may work even if the power goes out, because they're powered from the phone jack, which in turn is powered from the phone company's facilities. These are usually equipped with generators or backup batteries.
Cordless phones won't work if your home loses electric power, nor will Internet phone services like Vonage and Ooma.
Even if the phone company's facilities have backup power, the phone lines themselves are susceptible to wind and water damage. Luckily, a strike at Verizon Communications Inc., the largest local-phone company on the East Coast, ended last weekend, so repair crews should be fully staffed.
_ Phones hooked up to cable lines or Verizon FiOS lines aren't powered by those lines, but the modems in the home usually have backup batteries that will last about eight hours. That means corded phones will work without your home's electric power with these services. Again, cordless phones will be useless.
_ Vehicle emergency systems like General Motors Co.'s OnStar rely on a wireless network (OnStar uses Verizon's), so they're susceptible to network outages, just like cellphones. However, OnStar says customers report better luck connecting with their car systems than with cellphones, probably because the car has a much larger antenna, allowing it to reach more distant towers.
_ For true disaster preparedness, only a satellite phone will do. Unfortunately, both the phones and the service are expensive. AT&T sells an $800 smartphone called the Genus that can switch between the regular wireless network and routing calls through a satellite. The satellite option costs $25 per month, plus 65 cents per minute of calling. Iridium Communications Inc. sells similarly-priced dedicated satellite phones.
___
AP Auto Writer Tom Krisher contributed to this report.



Emergency Radio (Police Scanner)

iOS ($1.99)

Emergency Radio makes tuning into the police, fire, EMS, railroad, air traffic, NOAA weather, and coast guard effortless. Whether you’re in Los Angles, and you want to listen in on the LAPD, or New York, and you want to follow the FDNY, this app will keep you in the know. While Emergency Radio is iOS-only, Android users can use the comparable Scanner Radio (Free) or Scanner Radio Pro (2.99) to listen in.

Download Now for iPhone
Download Now for Android



Hurricane/Hurricane HD

iOS ($3.99)

Hurricane, for iPhone and iPod Touch, andHurricane HD, for iPad, are the definitive mobile apps for tracking Hurricane Irene. Both apps grant access to loads of data on past storms (against which you can compare current conditions) as well as video updates, courtesy of a partnership with HurricaneTrack.com. The Hurricane app is even on sale right now for $2. Alternatively, Android users can try SeaStorm to track Irene using the same NHC data.



NOAA Radar US

iOS ($1.99)

Billed as the “fastest loading animated radar app,” NOAA Radar US will help you quickly retrieve the latest NOAA data. Furthermore, because it updates every five minutes with combined data from over 150 NEXRAD radar stations, you’ll never be left behind. Although NOAA Radar US is iOS-exclusiveNOAA Radar and Alerts provides much of the same functionality, and access to the same basic data, for Android users





RadarScope

iOS and Android ($9.99)

If you prize granular detail over sheer speed, RadarScope, available for iOS and Android, warrants its hefty price tag ($10). You’ll gain access to feeds from the NOAA, detailed precipitation data—as well as the speed at which Irene is moving—and storm alerts galore. Now you’ll just may need a degree in meteorology to understand all that data.






Nixle

iOS (Free)

If you get tired of always seeking out new data on Irene, Nixle will let you take a step back and allow new information to come to you. No matter your mobile platform, you can sign up for free SMS alerts from police and other local municipal agencies. That said, iOS users can download Nixle’s free app to view local alerts in either a list or map view.






Global Alert Network

iOS, Android, and Blackberry (Free)

For more alerts, and more platform support—including iOSAndroid, and BlackBerry—download the Global Alert Network app. With the service you’ll have access to 100+ advisories, watches and warnings of national weather alerts as well as traffic alerts for 120 cities. Because those traffic alerts transmit to your phone as you approach a bottleneck, this app could save you a parking space the interstate.







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